I'm Kevin not kephin.

You will find, for the most part, Iceland-related things on this blog and generally music that I like.

If you want to know more about me then I suggest that you ask questions.


Audio

Apr 14, 2014
@ 10:10 pm
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Played 227 times.
42 notes

cabinhome:

Max Richter,  Sarajevo


Video

Apr 14, 2014
@ 9:45 pm
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20,294 notes

(Source: ekizinrealm, via neutralmilksteakhotel)


Video

Apr 13, 2014
@ 4:07 pm
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29 notes

tba21:

IT IS HERE! Scene (3) Ragnar Kjartansson and Friends: The Palace of the Summerland

The new episode of The Palace of the Summerland at TBA21–Augarten is following one of the most important member of the team Kjartan Sveinsson.


Link

Apr 10, 2014
@ 9:27 pm
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1 note

That's Numberwang »


Audio

Apr 6, 2014
@ 10:57 pm
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Played 12,345 times.
468 notes

chlofun:

The National | Fireproof

You’re fireproof
Nothing breaks your heart
You’re fireproof
It’s just the way you are

(Source: starlorrd)


Audio

Mar 31, 2014
@ 9:43 pm
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Played 1,620 times.
230 notes

thesleeperinthevalley:

Nantes by Beirut

(via chlofun)


Text

Mar 31, 2014
@ 5:38 am
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1,240 notes

actuallygrimes:

i am really jealous of people with huge national geographic collections that have like decades worth of National geographic magazines

I particularly want all of those nice maps.


Video

Mar 27, 2014
@ 8:55 pm
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5 notes

múm in Hong Kong. Seriously excellent.


Text

Mar 27, 2014
@ 2:39 am
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kephin turned 4 today, isn’t that neat? 


Photo

Mar 27, 2014
@ 1:20 am
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29 notes

icelandiclanguage:

shinyshoeshaveyouseenmymoves:

icelandiclanguage:

kephin:

cute.

What’s this from? This is both really simplistic and untrue.
Linguists in Iceland are quite divided on the subject of whether u-umlaut is an actual phonlogical rule in Icelandic, or simply a morpho-phonological tendency. There’s been quite the discussion in Íslenskt mál (the linguistics journal in Iceland) over the past few volumes. If you want to see discussion on why this statement circled in red is a gross oversimplification of things, you can for example read Haukur Þorgeirsson’s article in the 2012 volume of Íslenskt mál. 
What is in any case not debated anymore, is the fact that the “visible or invisible” part is completely untrue. Generative phonologists (see for example Eiríkur Rögnvaldsson 1981) used to argue that historical u-umlaut (that makes the plural of land, lönd) was an active phonological process in the modern language, activated by an invisble u-ending that never appears on the surface (in Proto-Norse, the plural was landu). They’ve since backed out of that theory, which I personally call underlying gymnastics. 
Right now, I think Anton Karl Ingason at UPenn is working on something that would involve some sort of convergence of the two opposing traditional ideas of u-umlaut in Modern Icelandic. You can read some of his ideas here: http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~ingason/papers/ingason2013umlautslides.pdf
Now I can’t see the rest of the discussion on the page, but aside from the intervening syllable that blocks u-umlaut, there are all sorts of exceptions like morpheme boundaries that render the so-called (in my opinion) phonlogical rule nothing more than a morpho-phonological tendency. 
The simplified view stated on the page would lead Icelandic-learners to over-generalize this. They would produce forms like dölnum instead of dalnum, köktus instead of kaktus, förðu instead of farðu, etc.

Not necessarily! Usually learners are taught pretty early on that loan words don’t always follow the normal rules, and the page above clarifies ‘As soon as there is an intermediate syllable that separates the two, however, the effect is neutralized and noting happens’. I’d expect consonant clusters like ‘kt’ ‘ln’ ‘rð’ to be explained as preventing this too.
I’m sure you’re right about the linguistic arguments, but for a beginner learner ‘cute’ ways of imagining the changes like this can really help. Of course there are exceptions, there are always exceptions, but no one is going to remember them all from the very beginning.
I really get it when something you know loads about is simplified down like this, it’s infuriating, but your language is pretty tough, and if this silly way of imagining it helps a beginner understand a little about sound mutations then surely that’s not the end of the world?

Well it’s not the consonant clusters, because you do have förðun for example. 
It’s not simplifying things for a learning advantage that bugs me, it’s the way it’s done in this case. Now as I said I don’t see the rest of the page, but judging from this, this is an oversimplification that can lead to mistakes, because of what is really randomness to the learner’s eye, in how u-umlaut behaves in Icelandic.
So, I would propose a more structured look, like say, here’s where u-umlaut works, here’s where it doesn’t, instead of stating it like a universal rule, and then having to explain loads and loads of instances where u-umlaut isn’t realized, as in dalnum, kaktus, etc, and all the examples of what seems like u-umlaut but there’s no u triggering it, which means it’s something else, like land-lönd, kassi-kössóttur, arabarnir-aröbonum (that’s the pronounciation, despite the spelling with u), and the cases where historical phonological changes mean that despite the spelling, different sound pairs behave in the exact same way, like drangi-dröngum. 
I want people to understand it by any means necessary =) as long as it’s right. I just think that the allergy analogy needs a bit of work, since a is defnitely not allergic to all u's, and some other sounds have the exact same symptoms when in contact with sounds that aren't u, and sometimes a has an allergy attack when there’s no u there, if we take this analogy further. 
But yeah cute analogies? Go for it. 

Just to clarify: the photo I took is from Daisy L Neijmann’s book Colloquial Icelandic (as dnyjsoudlouhe suggested) & the copy I have is at least as new as 2010. 
Here’s the full page if you’d like to have a look.

icelandiclanguage:

shinyshoeshaveyouseenmymoves:

icelandiclanguage:

kephin:

cute.

What’s this from? This is both really simplistic and untrue.

Linguists in Iceland are quite divided on the subject of whether u-umlaut is an actual phonlogical rule in Icelandic, or simply a morpho-phonological tendency. There’s been quite the discussion in Íslenskt mál (the linguistics journal in Iceland) over the past few volumes. If you want to see discussion on why this statement circled in red is a gross oversimplification of things, you can for example read Haukur Þorgeirsson’s article in the 2012 volume of Íslenskt mál

What is in any case not debated anymore, is the fact that the “visible or invisible” part is completely untrue. Generative phonologists (see for example Eiríkur Rögnvaldsson 1981) used to argue that historical u-umlaut (that makes the plural of land, lönd) was an active phonological process in the modern language, activated by an invisble u-ending that never appears on the surface (in Proto-Norse, the plural was landu). They’ve since backed out of that theory, which I personally call underlying gymnastics

Right now, I think Anton Karl Ingason at UPenn is working on something that would involve some sort of convergence of the two opposing traditional ideas of u-umlaut in Modern Icelandic. You can read some of his ideas here: http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~ingason/papers/ingason2013umlautslides.pdf

Now I can’t see the rest of the discussion on the page, but aside from the intervening syllable that blocks u-umlaut, there are all sorts of exceptions like morpheme boundaries that render the so-called (in my opinion) phonlogical rule nothing more than a morpho-phonological tendency. 

The simplified view stated on the page would lead Icelandic-learners to over-generalize this. They would produce forms like dölnum instead of dalnum, köktus instead of kaktus, förðu instead of farðu, etc.

Not necessarily! Usually learners are taught pretty early on that loan words don’t always follow the normal rules, and the page above clarifies ‘As soon as there is an intermediate syllable that separates the two, however, the effect is neutralized and noting happens’. I’d expect consonant clusters like ‘kt’ ‘ln’ ‘rð’ to be explained as preventing this too.

I’m sure you’re right about the linguistic arguments, but for a beginner learner ‘cute’ ways of imagining the changes like this can really help. Of course there are exceptions, there are always exceptions, but no one is going to remember them all from the very beginning.

I really get it when something you know loads about is simplified down like this, it’s infuriating, but your language is pretty tough, and if this silly way of imagining it helps a beginner understand a little about sound mutations then surely that’s not the end of the world?

Well it’s not the consonant clusters, because you do have förðun for example. 

It’s not simplifying things for a learning advantage that bugs me, it’s the way it’s done in this case. Now as I said I don’t see the rest of the page, but judging from this, this is an oversimplification that can lead to mistakes, because of what is really randomness to the learner’s eye, in how u-umlaut behaves in Icelandic.

So, I would propose a more structured look, like say, here’s where u-umlaut works, here’s where it doesn’t, instead of stating it like a universal rule, and then having to explain loads and loads of instances where u-umlaut isn’t realized, as in dalnum, kaktus, etc, and all the examples of what seems like u-umlaut but there’s no u triggering it, which means it’s something else, like land-lönd, kassi-kössóttur, arabarnir-aröbonum (that’s the pronounciation, despite the spelling with u), and the cases where historical phonological changes mean that despite the spelling, different sound pairs behave in the exact same way, like drangi-dröngum. 

I want people to understand it by any means necessary =) as long as it’s right. I just think that the allergy analogy needs a bit of work, since a is defnitely not allergic to all u's, and some other sounds have the exact same symptoms when in contact with sounds that aren't u, and sometimes a has an allergy attack when there’s no u there, if we take this analogy further. 

But yeah cute analogies? Go for it. 

Just to clarify: the photo I took is from Daisy L Neijmann’s book Colloquial Icelandic (as dnyjsoudlouhe suggested) & the copy I have is at least as new as 2010. 

Here’s the full page if you’d like to have a look.


Text

Mar 20, 2014
@ 12:17 am
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1 note

Also, someone said I looked like Howard from TBBT???

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Text

Mar 19, 2014
@ 10:52 pm
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3 notes

Pretty good day today, I helped out with a Particle Physics thing for 5th and 6th years at Maynooth. They were analysing data from CERN, ATLAS specifically, as well as learning a bit about particle physics and all that kind of stuff. Then they had a bit of a video conference with a few other universities and CERN. All very interesting. Learning about the universe, y’know how it is.

Then the lecturer running the thing brought the four of us out for a pint and we had a great chat about university  and his time at university too which was especially interesting. Then we got the bus home.

Idk, it’s kind of nice to be less formal with the people who teach you, y’know.  

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Text

Mar 15, 2014
@ 11:18 pm
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1 note

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Text

Mar 15, 2014
@ 3:31 pm
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1 note

I just read this comment on an already shit status on facebook:

in the 60’s the governments were needing more tax revenue so Feminism was conceived it’s got nothing to do with gender equality. it was one of many social engineering expirements by the powers to be. True story.

Somebody shoot me.

Do people like this have no awareness at all as to how fucking moronic this sounds?


Photo

Mar 11, 2014
@ 12:06 am
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1 note

Just been skimming through all the photos I have from Iceland.
I like this one.

Just been skimming through all the photos I have from Iceland.

I like this one.